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Full text of "Alaskan glacier studies of the National Geographic Society in the Yakutat Bay, Prince William Sound and lower Copper River regions"

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262
ALASKAN GLACIER STUDIES
Station C, elevation 1497 feet above tide, at timber line on a long east-west spur east of the glacier, is a stake driven into a joint in a rock ledge.
READINGS
Point Sighted	Ver.A	Ver.B	Angle from B-C
1. Station B (Heather Island)	1909     0   0'	180   0'	
	1910     0   0'	180   0'	
2. Point of glacier just east of  Heather	1909     6 36'	186 36'	6 36' (D)
Island.    (Same as No. 5, Sta. B.)	1910     6 58'	186 58'	6 58' (D)
3. Point where glacier leaves land on east	1909   23 46'	203 46'	23 46' (E)
side.    (Same as No. 6, Sta. B.)	1910   23 32'	203 32'	23 32' (E)
4. Most eastern projection of glacier toward	1909 102 44'	282 44'	102 447 (F)
inside lake.	1910 105 05'	285 05'	105 05' (F)
5. First bend in glacier north of No. 4.	1909   95 27'	275 27'	95 277 (G)
	1910   96 52'	276 52'	96 52' (G)
6. Next bend in glacier north of No. 5.	1909   99 49'	279 49'	99 49' (Ga)
	1910 101 10'	281 10'	101 10' (Ga)
7. Edge of glacier on west side of first nuna-	1909   93 24'	273 24'	93 24' (H)
tak.	1910   94 26'	274 26'	94 26' (H)
8. South edge of glacier on east side of sec-	1909 118 00'	298 00'	118 00' (I)
ond nunatak.	1910 118 56'	298 56'	118 56' (I)
9. West edge of glacier near the north end	1909 124 36'	304 36'	124 36' (J)
and on the east side of second nunatak	1910 125 55'	305 55'	125 55'
10. Tongue of east branch of glacier north of	1910 119 56'	299 56'	119 56'
alluvial fan.			
The points located by these two sets of transit readings when plotted (Fig. 30) show the advance of the glacier during ten months from 1909 to 1910.
General Features of Columbia Glacier. This giant among the glaciers of Prince William Sound has its source upon the southern slopes of the Chugach Mountains. Its length is not known, only the southern fifteen miles having been seen by white men. It rises near the base of Florence Peak1, which is 11,190 feet high (PI. XCIII) and is the highest point in the Chugach Mountains. It is possible that the length of Columbia Glacier is twenty-five miles or more and that it heads upon snowfield passes whence it is continued as a through glacier with the Valdez and Shoup Glaciers of Port Valdez to the east and the Tazlina Glacier of the Copper River drainage to the north. The lower part of the glacier varies in width from three to four miles, and the lower valley walls rise 2500 to 3200 feet.
The ice stream flows southwestward from its unknown source, and about nine miles from the sea turns abruptly southward. At the turn there is a 3664 foot peak, east of which the glacier sends a distributary southward for three and a half miles. This is one to two miles wide and at its terminus nearly, if not quite, coalesces with the main glacier,
> Named by the junior author of this book in 1910 for his wife.